Superconducting qubits

A platform based on superconducting qubits is a prominent candidate for quantum computers. In this approach, qubits are realized using superconducting circuits. An advantage of this technology are the fast read-out times and the huge versatility – as different types qubits with preferred properties can be manufactured. By now, superconducting qubits are very well mastered and can be initialized, manipulated and measured very precisely. By using microwave pulses, the interactions between different qubits can be controlled via tunable couplers creating entanglement among the qubits.

Within the SQQC consortium, MQV researchers improve the performance of superconducting quantum processors by optimizing the system in all aspects and focusing on novel types of superconducting qubits. These novel qubit-types show intrinsic protection against noise, longer lifetimes and high anharmonicity which promises an advantage in terms of scalability of superconducting quantum systems. Apart from the close exchange with other MQV consortia regarding the “full-stack” approach, the scientists actively participate in other federally funded projects in the field of superconducting qubits.


Related projects

MUNIQC-SC – Munich Quantum Valley Quantum-Computer Demonstrators

Goal of the MUNIQC-SC project is to build a quantum-computer demonstrator with up to 100 superconducting qubits. It targets the full quantum-computing stack from superconducting circuit hardware to its integration into high-performance computing environments. Complementary to the research efforts within the SQQC consortium, MUNIQC-SC focuses on the scalable integration, reproducibility and controllability of well-established transmon-type qubits in a collaborative effort with universities, research and technology organizations, start-ups and industrial partners.

Links

quantentechnologien.de [German]

GeQCoS – German Quantum Computer based on Superconducting Qubits

The aim of GeQCoS is to develop and test improved building blocks of quantum computers based on superconducting qubits. From alternative qubits over novel many-qubit couplers to travelling-wave parametric amplifiers and enhanced control techniques, this Germany-wide collaboration pushes to combine novel approaches in a nine-qubit  demonstrator by the end of 2024.

Links

quantentechnologien.de [German]